Nice Traditional Kitchen photos

By | October 25, 2017

A few nice traditional kitchen images I found:

Rummy in the sun
traditional kitchen
Image by Ed Yourdon
My dog prefers the sunny spots in the living room and kitchen whenever he’s looking for someplace to curl up and take a nap. Don’t ask me why; if I were a dog, I would always look for a shady spot. But then I’m not a dog …

Because of the bright light, my iPhone decided to shoot this shot at 1/562 second and at a low ISO of 32(!). But for some reason, it also decided to use a shallow aperture of f/2.2.

I’m sure I could have gotten a much better picture with any of my "serious" cameras, but Rummy would not have stayed in one spot long enough … I was headed out to the kitchen to get a cup of coffee, spotted him lying on the rug, and simply snapped a quick shot with my iPhone. Like so many other events in our lives, this is a scene that I probably never will get around to photographing properly, and I figured it was better to have a simple iPhone shot than none at all.

In any case, I thought it was an interesting photo, and I gave it four stars in my Aperture rating system. But not five stars, so it never did get uploaded as a "public" Flickr photo.

P.S. If you’re curious, Rummy is a Maltese, and he weighs about 6 pounds. And he’s 11 years old, which means that (in dog years) he’s probably older than you are.

Note: moments after I uploaded this photo, one of my loyal Flickr friends "faved" it. So I’ve changed the status of the photo to "public."

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Whether you’re an amateur or professional photographer, it’s hard to walk around with a modern smartphone in your pocket, and not be tempted to use the built-in camera from time-to-time. Veteran photographers typically sneer at such behavior, and most will tell you that they can instantly recognize an iPhone photo, which they mentally reject as being unworthy of any serious attention.

After using many earlier models of smartphones over the past several years, I was inclined to agree; after all, I always (well, almost always) had a “real” camera in my pocket (or backpack or camera-bag), and it was always capable of taking a much better photographic image than the mediocre, grainy images shot with a camera-phone.

But still … there were a few occasions when I desperately wanted to capture some photo-worthy event taking place right in front of me, and inevitably it turned out to be the times when I did not have the “real” camera with me. Or I did have it, but it was buried somewhere in a bag, and I knew that the “event” would have disappeared by the time I found the “real" camera and turned it on. By contrast, the smart-phone was always in my pocket (along with my keys and my wallet, it’s one of the three things I consciously grab every time I walk out the door). And I often found that I could turn it on, point it at the photographic scene, and take the picture much faster than I could do the same thing with a “traditional” camera.

Meanwhile, smartphone cameras have gotten substantially better in the past few years, from a mechanical/hardware perspective; and the software “intelligence” controlling the camera has become amazingly sophisticated. It’s still not on the same level as a “professional” DSLR camera, but for a large majority of the “average” photographic situations we’re likely to encounter in the unplanned moments of our lives, it’s more and more likely to be “good enough.” The old adage of “the best camera is the one you have with you” is more and more relevant these days. For me, 90% of the success in taking a good photo is simply being in the right place at the right time, being aware that the “photo opportunity” is there, and having a camera — any camera — to take advantage of that opportunity. Only 10% of the time does it matter which camera I’m using, or what technical features I’ve managed to use.

And now, with the recent advent of the iPhone5s, there is one more improvement — which, as far as I can tell, simply does not exist in any of the “professional” cameras. You can take an unlimited number of “burst-mode” shots with the new iPhone, simply by keeping your finger on the shutter button; instead of being limited to just six (as a few of the DSLR cameras currently offer), you can take 10, 20, or even a hundred shots. And then — almost magically — the iPhone will show you which one or two of the large burst of photos was optimally sharp and clear. With a couple of clicks, you can then delete everything else, and retain only the very best one or two from the entire burst.

With that in mind, I’ve begun using my iPhone5s for more and more “everyday” photo situations out on the street. Since I’m typically photographing ordinary, mundane events, even the one or two “optimal” shots that the camera-phone retains might not be worth showing anyone else … so there is still a lot of pruning and editing to be done, and I’m lucky if 10% of those “optimal” shots are good enough to justify uploading to Flickr and sharing with the rest of the world. Still, it’s an enormous benefit to know that my editing work can begin with photos that are more-or-less “technically” adequate, and that I don’t have to waste even a second reviewing dozens of technically-mediocre shots that are fuzzy, or blurred.

Oh, yeah, one other minor benefit of the iPhone5s (and presumably most other current brands of smartphone): it automatically geotags every photo and video, without any special effort on the photographer’s part. Only one of my other big, fat cameras (the Sony Alpha SLT A65) has that feature, and I’ve noticed that almost none of the “new” mirrorless cameras have got a built-in GPS thingy that will perform the geotagging…

I’ve had my iPhone5s for a couple of months now, but I’ve only been using the “burst-mode” photography feature aggressively for the past couple of weeks. As a result, the initial batch of photos that I’m uploading are all taken in the greater-NYC area. But as time goes on, and as my normal travel routine takes me to other parts of the world, I hope to add more and more “everyday” scenes in cities that I might not have the opportunity to photograph in a “serious” way.

Stay tuned….

Euston Rural Pastimes Event 2014
traditional kitchen
Image by Dave Catchpole
Euston Rural Pastimes Event 2014
8th June 2014
Celebrating 23 Years!

A traditional, English Country Fair for all the family.

Has now been held every June for 23 years. It began as a fundraising show for our local Blackbourne Churches and St Nicholas’ Hospice Care with the kind permission of our President The Duke of Grafton, who allowed the event to be held in the magnificent setting of Euston Park.

Together with John Farrow (the farm manager at that time) and Tim Fogden we set up a volunteer committee, which has continued to run this successful one day Show. We have raised over £450,000 for our causes over the years.

The programme has been broadly similar each year, but with increasing entries the demand for space has required more parking and display areas. A new entrance between the stationary engines and stalls, leads past the traction engines to the new Grafton Ring specifically for tractors.

The main Norfolk Ring has a constant programme of events, displays, demonstrations and parades. It is surrounded by band music, a busy tea tent and further stalls. Leading past the Craft Tent, the Suffolk Ring is home to a large display of Heavy Horses. Nearby is the start of the hugely popular Farm Rides. It has also been associated with a magnificent display of flowers in Euston Church.

There are several catering outlets, but the most popular are the excellent lunches served in the Hall kitchen.

Keeping very much to the same format we hope to continue to attract the numbers, which filled the car park completely last year.

What to see:
Rural Crafts
Countryside Area
Steam Engines (Traction Engines, Road Roller, Commercial and Public Service Vehicles)
Tractors
Lorries
Heavy Horses
Classic and Vintage Cars
Motorcycles
Stationary Engines
Three Show Rings (Norfolk, Suffolk & Grafton) featuring many display throughout the day.
This year featuring The Knights of the Damned jousting display team.
Performing in a fantastic, coloured costumed display of Medieval Jousting at its very best. Consisting of heroic mounted knights and their squires and enhanced by our own commentator the tournament begins with fanfares and introductions and ends with the dramatic thundering of hooves as the knights attempt to unhorse each other in the ‘JOUST’. Watch as the knights hone their skills by striking the man-shaped target, the quintain, and attempt to spear peasants heads off the ground at speed. The show also boasts superbly choreographed foot fights with unmerciless swords, flaming fireballs on chains and unyielding quarterstaffs as well as the knights romantically accepting favours from the ladies and fighting for their honour.

Raffles Courtyard, Raffles Hotel, Singapore
traditional kitchen
Image by Eustaquio Santimano
Built in the tropical setting of an open courtyard, Raffles Courtyard, a timeless structure with white arches flanked by tropical palms and native plants, keeps the feeling of ‘Old Singapore’ alive. A colonial cocktail bar, a traditional alfresco kitchen, table umbrellas and live music make the courtyard a pleasant place for patrons to watch the passing parade of visitors.

Complementing the alfresco experience is the courtyard’s ocean-fresh seafood, prepared à la minute in any Asian style that guests request.

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