Nice Beautiful Classic Kitchen Design photos

By | August 10, 2017

Check out these Beautiful classic kitchen design images:

Marilyn Monroe, William Powell, Lauren Bacall, “How to Marry a Millionaire” (1953)
Beautiful classic kitchen design
Image by classic_film
Screen capture, "How to Marry a Millionaire," 1953

In the kitchen, with actresses Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962) and Lauren Bacall (September 16, 1924 – August 12, 2014), with veteran actor William Powell (July 29, 1892 – March 5, 1984) in the center. Monroe is wearing an iconic, form-fitting white gown with matching fur stole. Bacall is wearing an elegant black evening dress with an off-the-shoulder sweetheart neckline. Both were designed by acclaimed Hollywood costumer William Travilla.

The film "How to Marry a Millionaire," was nominated for an Oscar for Best Costume Design — more about the movie:
Distributed by 20th Century Fox, How to Marry a Millionaire was filmed in Technicolor and was the first film ever to be photographed in the new CinemaScope wide-screen process, although it was the second Cinemascope film released by Fox after the biblical epic film The Robe.
 
How to Marry a Millionaire was also the first 1950s color and CinemaScope film ever to be shown on prime time network television (though panned-and-scanned), when it was presented as the first film on NBC Saturday Night at the Movies on September 23, 1961.
 
[…]
 
How to Marry a Millionaire premiered at the Fox Wilshire Theatre (now the Saban Theatre), in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 1953. The film was a box office success earning millions worldwide and .5 million domestically, making it Fox’s second highest grossing film of that year (with The Robe being the first), and was the fourth highest-grossing film of 1953, whereas Monroe’s previous feature Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was the ninth.

Image from page 28 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)
Beautiful classic kitchen design
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: stnicholasserial71dodg
Title: St. Nicholas [serial]
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: [New York : Scribner & Co.]
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
… . .:.:. .:•: ± though a thing may be beautiful without this you all know what pretty designs are formed from evenness or regularity. bits of glass or other material within the angles of Many of the fairest forms of classic decoration your kaleidoscopes,are made by the repetition of shapes in themselves I want to show you a very pretty illustration of I879-) ARBOR VIT^i OR NOTl II the effect of repetition and one which any of youmay easily make as an ornament to the fly leaf ofa book or for any other purpose where it is desiredto introduce a name as an adornment. This is the way to make it. Take a bit of papersay about the size of a playing-card,and fold it lengthwise, then open itflat and write any name, as I havewritten Allie here, directly overthe crease caused by folding;fold it again and with anivory paper cutter, a knifehandle or your thumb-nail, rub evenly over thefolded paper, and thename written withthe soft black leadpencil will be slight-ly set off on the

Text Appearing After Image:
opposite side of the crease, as seen in the thirdsketch. The faint impression may then be tracedover with pencil, and you will have the prettyfigure of the two Allies, as shown on this page. If it is desired totransfer this to thefly leaf of a book, thewhole design may be laidface down and rubbed asdescribed and the slight im-pression that is left, finished upafterward with ink or pencil. If the fly leaf is dark paper, the double name may be painted over in gold, bright red or other color to contrast with the ground; and I think if you will try and make a double name, you will, after one or two attempts, succeed and think it very pretty. ARBOR VITjE OR NOT? By Ella A. Drinkwater. Supper was over, the dishes were washed, andthere was no one in the tidy little kitchen but Wal-lace and Diantha. Wallace was on his knees be-fore the stove stirring some evergreen branches ina large pan in the oven, and Diantha was prepar-ing to make a sponge for Graham bread. How good and woodsy that smells

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Marilyn Monroe in White Evening Gown, “How to Marry a Millionaire” (1953)
Beautiful classic kitchen design
Image by classic_film
Screen capture, "How to Marry a Millionaire," 1953

Kitchen scene, actress Marilyn Monroe (June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), wearing glasses and an iconic, form-fitting white evening gown with matching fur stole designed by William Travilla.

The film "How to Marry a Millionaire," was nominated for an Oscar for Best Costume Design — more about the movie:
Distributed by 20th Century Fox, How to Marry a Millionaire was filmed in Technicolor and was the first film ever to be photographed in the new CinemaScope wide-screen process, although it was the second Cinemascope film released by Fox after the biblical epic film The Robe.
 
How to Marry a Millionaire was also the first 1950s color and CinemaScope film ever to be shown on prime time network television (though panned-and-scanned), when it was presented as the first film on NBC Saturday Night at the Movies on September 23, 1961.
 
[…]
 
How to Marry a Millionaire premiered at the Fox Wilshire Theatre (now the Saban Theatre), in Beverly Hills, California, on November 4, 1953. The film was a box office success earning millions worldwide and .5 million domestically, making it Fox’s second highest grossing film of that year (with The Robe being the first), and was the fourth highest-grossing film of 1953, whereas Monroe’s previous feature Gentlemen Prefer Blondes was the ninth.


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