Cool Traditional Kitchen images

By | February 1, 2018

Some cool traditional kitchen images:

Euston Park Rural Pastimes Event
traditional kitchen
Image by Dave Catchpole
Euston Park Rural Pastimes Event
Celebrating 21 Years!

A traditional, English Country Fair for all the family.
Has now been held every June for 21 years. It began as a fundraising show for our local Blackbourne Churches and St Nicholas’ Hospice Care with the kind permission of our President The Duke of Grafton, who allowed the event to be held in the magnificent setting of Euston Park.
Together with John Farrow (the farm manager at that time) and Tim Fogden we set up a volunteer committee, which has continued to run this successful one day Show. We have raised over £370,000 for our causes over the years.
The programme has been broadly similar each year, but with increasing entries the demand for space has required more parking and display areas. A new entrance between the stationary engines and stalls, leads past the traction engines to the new Grafton Ring specifically for tractors.
The main Norfolk Ring has a constant programme of events, displays, demonstrations and parades. It is surrounded by band music, a busy tea tent and further stalls. Leading past the Craft Tent, the Suffolk Ring is home to a large display of Heavy Horses. Nearby is the start of the hugely popular Farm Rides. It has also been associated with a magnificent display of flowers in Euston Church.
There are several catering outlets, but the most popular are the excellent lunches served in the Hall kitchen.
Keeping very much to the same format we hope to continue to attract the numbers, which filled the car park completely last year.

What to see:
Rural Crafts
Countryside Area
Steam Engines (Traction Engines, Road Roller, Commercial and Public Service Vehicles)
Tractors
Lorries
Heavy Horses
Classic and Vintage Cars
Motorcycles
Stationary Engines
Three Show Rings (Norfolk, Suffolk & Grafton) featuring many display throughout the day.

Concave Corner Wall Cupboard
traditional kitchen
Image by ChalonHandmade

The Annunciation of the Virgin Deal
traditional kitchen
Image by failing_angel
Mixed material tapestry by Grayson Perry

Part of ‘The Vanity of Small Differences’ – a series of 6 tapestries (200x400cm)

In The Vanity of Small Differences Grayson Perry explores his fascination with taste and the visual story it tells of our interior lives in a series of six tapestries at Victoria Miro and three programmes, All in the Best Possible Taste with Grayson Perry, for Channel 4. The artist goes on a safari amongst the taste tribes of Britain, to gather inspiration for his artworks, literally weaving the characters he meets into a narrative partly inspired by Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress.
Grayson Perry comments: "The tapestries tell the story of class mobility, for I think nothing has as strong an influence on our aesthetic taste as the social class in which we grow up. I am interested in the politics of consumerism and the history of popular design but for this project I focus on the emotional investment we make in the things we choose to live with, wear, eat, read or drive. Class and taste run deep in our character – we care. This emotional charge is what draws me to a subject".
Perry has always worked with traditional media; ceramics, cast iron, bronze, printmaking and tapestry. He is interested in how each historic category of object accrues over time intellectual and emotional baggage. Tapestry is the art form of grand houses: depicting classical myths, historical and religious scenes and epic battles. In this series of works Perry plays with idea of using this ancient allegorical art to elevate the commonplace dramas of modern British life.
The artist’s primary inspiration was A Rake’s Progress (1732 -33) by William Hogarth, which in eight paintings tells the story of Tom Rakewell, a young man who inherits a fortune from his miserly father, spends it all on fashionable pursuits and gambling, marries for money, gambles away a second fortune, goes to debtors’ prison and dies in a madhouse.
The Vanity of Small Differences tells the story of the rise and demise of Tim Rakewell and is composed of characters, incidents and objects Perry encountered on journeys through Sunderland, Tunbridge Wells and The Cotswolds. Hogarth has long been an influence on Perry’s works, his Englishness, his robust humour and his depiction of, in his own words, ‘modern moral subjects’. The secondary influence comes from Perry’s favourite form of art, early Renaissance painting.
Each of the six images, to a greater or lesser extent, pays homage to a religious work. Including Masaccio’s Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheim Altarpiece, Rogier Van de Weyden’s Lamentation and three different paintings of The Annunciation by Carlo Crivelli, Grünewald and Robert Campin. The images also reference the pictorial display of wealth and status in The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan Van Eyck and Mr & Mrs Andrews by Thomas Gainsborough. Woven into each tapestry are snatches of text, each one in the voice of a participant in the scene illustrated. Each image also features a small dog, reminiscent of Hogarth’s beloved pug, Trump.

The Annunciation of the Virgin Deal, 2012
Tim is relaxing with his family in the kitchen of his large, rural (second) home. His business partner has just told him he is now an extremely wealthy man as they have sold their software business to Richard Branson.
On the table is a still life demonstrating the cultural bounty of his affluent lifestyle. His parents-in-law read and his elder child plays on the rug. Tim dandles his baby while his wife tweets.
This image includes references to three different paintings of the Annunciation, by Carlo Crivelli (the vegetables), Matthias Grunewald (his colleague’s expression) and Robert Campin (the jug of lilies). The convex mirror and discarded shoes are reminders of that great pictorial display of wealth and status, The Arnolfini Portrait, by Jan Van Eyck.

[Initial text from Victoria Miro Gallery, description of each piece by Grayson Perry from C4 website]

Previously a furniture factory, the Victoria Miro Gallery lies just off City Road. The garden at the back also holds a reclaimed part of Regent’s Canal at Wenlock Basin.

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